Humanitarian Arrivals in Melbourne

An Extended Research Report, Summary Report and Postcard are available for download.

The Humanitarian Arrivals and Health Services research project was originally developed in 2014 as a small scoping study to identify the location of humanitarian arrivals across Melbourne and the availability of health services that addresses their needs. The small scoping study became much bigger very quickly and took over 2 years to complete. The research was developed in response to need and a lack of available evidence and demographic data on humanitarian entrants within Victoria making it very difficult to plan and prepare for the needs of these rapidly changing populations. Services were overloaded and population movements were creating demands that had not previously been well quantified or assessed and evidence was needed to better inform future service planning. The project was conducted by a research team at the McCaughey VicHealth Community Wellbeing Unit, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne. The research team included Dr Melanie Davern, Associate Professor Deborah Warr, Dr Karen Block, Dr Camille La Brooy, Ashraf Hosseini, Dr Elizabeth Taylor, and Rebecca Roberts.  

The research was developed in partnership with the Department of Health and Human Services and guided by a Research Advisory Group that included the Department of Health and Human Services, AMES Australia, Foundation House, Victorian Refugee Health Network, Western Melbourne Refugee and Asylum Seeker Partnership, Cohealth, Wyndham City Council, Brimbank City Council, Hume City Council, Office of Multicultural Affairs, Department of Premier and Cabinet and the Refugee Council of Australia. The Research Advisory Group contributed insights, guidance and expertise towards the project, to ensure that the findings were useful with practical implications to people working on the ground.

Several quantitative data sets were identified as useful to achieving the objectives of the research: the Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Census and Migrants Integrated Dataset (2011); Department of Immigration and Border Protection Settlement Database (2010-2015); the AMES Australia Humanitarian Entrants Management System (2013-2015); and the National Health Services Directory for General Practitioner listings. The report provides spatial analyses of each of these data sets and detailed information on visa categories within locations, countries of birth, languages spoken and changes to settlement patterns over time. These quantitative analyses also informed in-depth interviews with key informants providing health services to humanitarian arrivals including members of the project’s Research Advisory Group. The extensive Extended Research Report documents spatial and qualitative research, key findings and provides 12 recommendations for future policy and practice.

Research findings are made available as electronic files and can be downloaded as an Extended Research Report including all data summaries or short Summary Research Report.

Report content and maps are copyright and when reproduced from these reports must include attribution and cite the references provided below. Acknowledgement of maps, material and interpretation must be cited at the beginning of any publication or report that includes the research findings.

Summary Report

Davern, M., Warr, D., Block, K., La Brooy, C., Taylor, E. & Hosseini, A. (2016). Humanitarian Arrivals in Melbourne: A spatial analysis of population distribution and health service needs. Summary Report. University of Melbourne: Melbourne, Victoria. www.communityindicators.net.au/humanitarian_arrivals_in_melbourne

Extended Research Report

Davern, M., Warr, D., Block, K., La Brooy, C., Taylor, E. & Hosseini, A. (2016). Humanitarian Arrivals in Melbourne: A spatial analysis of population distribution and health service needs. Extended Report. University of Melbourne: Melbourne, Victoria. www.communityindicators.net.au/humanitarian_arrivals_in_melbourne